Biogas Facility Opened in Denmark

Utility firm, E.ON Denmark, has opened a 300,000 tonne per year Grøngas Vraa organic waste to biogas anaerobic digestion facility.

By BEN MESSENGER

Soren Gade turns on the tap connecting the Grøngas Vraa biogas plant to the Danish gas network.

6000m-2

Utility firm, E.ON Denmark, has opened a 300,000 tonne per year Grøngas Vraa organic waste to biogas anaerobic digestion facility.

The company said that the 115 million crown ($17.5 million) facility will produce biomethane from manure and organic wastes and is directly connected to the Danish gas network.

The new biogas plant in Vrå will process 300,000 tonnes of biomass annually, of which approximately 250,000 tonnes is expected to be manure that would otherwise have ended up as untreated on fields.

“When we open the taps for the new biogas plant today, we make it easier to convert manure and food scraps to green energy,” commented Tore Harritshøj, adm. director of E.ON Denmark.

He added that the plant will also reduce Denmark’s CO2 emissions by approximately 25,000 tonnes annually.

The biogas plant, which is the size of 12 football fields, is expected to supply the Danish gas grid with approximately 9 million. cubic meters of biomethane. This corresponds to the annual consumption of 4300 cars or 250 buses if they were running on biogas or the gas consumption of 6500 homes.

E.ON noted that there is still a long way to meet Denmark’s policy objectives of converting 50% of the country’s manure into biogas by 2020. With Grøngas online and several new plants  due for completion in 2016 it said that barely 15% of Danish manure is now used for biogas production.

The company said that the Grøngas Vraa employs approximately 10 people.

 

Produced but never eaten: a visual guide to food waste

Whether the wastage is measured in tonnes of spoiled goods, hectares of agricultural land or household expenditure, the scale is frightening

How much food is wasted globally each year?

Each year 1.3bn tonnes of food, about a third of all that is produced, is wasted, including about 45% of all fruit and vegetables, 35% of fish and seafood, 30% of cereals, 20% of dairy products and 20% of meat.

What does this mean for agriculture?

About 1.4bn hectares, or close to 30% of available agricultural land, is used to grow or farm food that is subsequently wasted. This is particularly alarming given estimates that by 2050 food production will need to have increased by 60% on 2005 levels to feed a growing global population. Reducing food wastage would ease the burden on resources as the world attempts to meet future demand.

Where, how and when is most of the food wasted?

In developing countries there are high levels of what is known as “food loss”, which is unintentional wastage, often due to poor equipment, transportation and infrastructure. In wealthy countries, there are low levels of unintentional losses but high levels of “food waste”, which involves food being thrown away by consumers because they have purchased too much, or by retailers who reject food because of exacting aesthetic standards.

 

How about the UK – What type of foods do we waste most?

In the UK, 15m tonnes of food is lost or wasted each year and consumers throw away 4.2m tonnes of edible food each year. The foods most commonly found in British bins are bread, vegetables, fruit and milk.

What does this mean for the average family?

The average family throws away £700 worth of perfectly good food a year, or almost or almost £60 worth of food a month. The average weekly expenditure on food and non-alcoholic drinks in 2013 was £58.80 according to the ONS, which means a typical family throws away a week’s worth of groceries each month.

sumber : http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2015/aug/12/produced-but-never-eaten-a-visual-guide-to-food-waste

Harvest Power Sells 6 MW Anaerobic Digestion Biogas Plant in Ontario

Harvest Power Sells 6 MW Anaerobic Digestion Biogas Plant in Ontario

StormFisher Environmental has acquired the London Energy Garden, an anaerobic digester which processes organic waste from southwestern Ontario into biogas and natural fertilisers, from Harvest Ontario Partners – a part of Waltham, Massachusetts based AD developer, Harvest Power.

In Ontario, Canada StormFisher Environmental has acquired the London Energy Garden, an anaerobic digester which processes organic waste from southwestern Ontario into biogas and natural fertilisers, from Harvest Ontario Partners – a part of Waltham, Massachusetts based AD developer, Harvest Power.
harvest-london-site
The facility, which was developed by Harvest Power, turns organic materials such as food scraps, food production residuals, fats oils and grease, and other discarded organic waste from food processors, retailers and food retail outlets into biogas which is used to generate electricity, as well as fertilisers.

StormFisher Environmental is majority owned and operated by StormFisher, Ltd, a company said to have deep Ontario market knowledge and biogas experience. Harvest Power is a minority owner in StormFisher Environmental.

The facility started operations in spring 2013, has a capacity: 70,000 tonnes per year and generates approximately 6 MW combined heat and power as well as 5200 tonnes of granular fertiliser.

“We are excited to invest new capital and enhance operations at the London Energy Garden,” commented Chris Guillon, vice president of StormFisher Environmental. “These developments open up even more opportunities to serve the organic waste processing needs of the region.”

According to Chris Kasper, CEO of Harvest Power, the facility is in good hands. He added, “Their team was involved in the original design of the site, so it’s fitting to see their involvement come full circle,” he commented.

source: http://waste-management-world.com/a/harvest-power-sells-6-mw-anaerobic-digestion-biogas-plant-in-ontario

Israeli Domestic Biogas Kit Hits Crowd-Fund Target in 24hrs

Israeli Domestic Biogas Kit Hits Crowd-Fund Target in 24hrs

An Israeli crowd-funding project to produce a domestic scale biogas digester able to produce enough gas for two hours cooking per day has reached its $100,000 goal on its first day.

home-biogas

An Israeli crowd-funding project to produce a domestic scale biogas digester able to produce enough gas for two hours cooking per day has reached its $100,000 goal on its first day.
In an effort to provide safe and efficient energy to both rural and urban homes, Tel Aviv based HomeBiogasLTD said that it has created a self-assembled biogas system that turns kitchen waste and livestock manure into usable cooking gas and liquid fertiliser.

Optimised for on and off grid urban and rural families, the system is claimed to produce clean cooking gas for three meals and 10 liters of clean natural  liquid fertiliser per day.

According to the developer, as an outdoor biological system HomeBiogas kits are easy to transport and fast to set up, user friendly, and able to significantly reducing dangerous greenhouse gas emissions and pollutants entering our groundwater. The company claimed that using one system could offset a car’s annual carbon emissions.

The system, which has been CE certified for safety, has also been tested and approved for safety and health by the Israeli Ministry Of Environmental Protection and the Ministry of Energy and Infrastructure.

Reduced indoor air pollution
According to HomeBiogas the system also has many health and productivity benefits for families in rural areas. It noted the 2012 WHO Report which found that some 4.3 million women and children die every year from indoor air pollution due to smoke of open cooking fires.

It said that cooking and heating with HomeBiogas reduces deaths and respiratory diseases of women and children as it eliminates the need to use open fires.

The system was also said to saves labour too as families do not need to spend hours collecting and carrying heavy firewood loads every day.

“Our goal at HomeBiogas is to make this system available to everyone, whether you live in a rural area or are an urbanite with a modern kitchen,” said Oshik Efrati, CEO of HomeBiogas.”

“Our system eliminates waste, makes clean gas, and puts an end to breathing in cooking smoke. If everyone owned a HomeBiogas unit, our world would be much cleaner, safer, and greener,” Efrati added.

The company said that so far over 150 units have been in operation in undeveloped communities for over a year and it has been involved with a number of international organisations during this development stage. A video looking at one such project with the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies can be viewed below.

HomeBiogas has now launched a 30 day Indiegogo campaign where contributors can receive discounts on the first retail models to hit the market. The campaign can be found HERE

 

source : http://waste-management-world.com/a/israeli-domestic-biogas-kit-hits-crowd-fund-target-in-24hrs

Pemkab Wonogiri akan Bangun TPA di Wuryantoro

Pemkab Wonogiri akan Bangun TPA di Wuryantoro

8 Juli 2015 0:19 WIB

Foto: suaramerdeka.com/dok

WONOGIRI, suaramerdeka.com – Pemkab Wonogiri berencana membangun Tempat Pembuangan Akhir (TPA) di wilayah Kecamatan Wuryantoro. TPA di Wuryantoro itu akan menampung sampah dari wilayah karst di Pracimantoro, Eromoko, dan Manyaran.

Kepala Dinas Pekerjaan Umum (DPU) Kabupaten Wonogiri, Sri Kuncoro melalui Kabid Kebersihan, Toto Prasojo mengungkapkan,feasibility study (studi kelayakan) telah disusun untuk membangun TPA Wuryantoro. Saat ini, pihaknya telah memasuki fase pembebasan lahan.

Toto mengungkapkan, lahan yang akan dibebaskan untuk saat ini hanya sekitar 7.000 m2. “Tetapi, lahan di sekitarnya masih banyak, sehingga di masa mendatang masih memungkinkan untuk diperluas,” katanya, baru-baru ini.

Dia mengatakan, TPA Wuryantoro dipilih untuk menampung sampah di daerah karst. “Tidak boleh membangun TPA di wilayah karst, seperti di Pracimantoro dan Eromoko. Karena itu, kami akan menempatkan TPA di Wuryantoro,” ujarnya.

Di wilayah Kecamatan Pracimantoro sebenarnya ada tempat pembuangan sampah. Namun, tempat itu kemudian masuk ke dalam kawasan Museum Karst Indonesia. “Sebenarnya, tempat pembuangan sampahnya sudah ada sebelum museum karst dibangun. Tetapi, karena di sana tidak boleh ada pembuangan sampah, kami berencana memindahkannya ke Wuryantoro,” katanya.

(Khalid Yogi/CN39/SM Network)

sumber : http://berita.suaramerdeka.com/pemkab-wonogiri-akan-bangun-tpa-di-wuryantoro/

A Photographer’s 6 Unique Views of Food Waste

Vienna-based photographer Klaus Pichler aimed to bring attention to food waste with his photography series, “One Third.” The title refers to the percentage of food products that go to waste worldwide, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste
Strawberries

Sort: Strawberries ‘Elsanta’ * Place of production: San Giovanni Lupatoto, Verona, Italy

Cultivation method: Foil green house * Time of harvest: June – October

Transporting distance: 741 km * Means of transportation: Truck

Carbon footprint (total) per kg: 0,35 kg * Water requirement (total) per kg: 348 l

Price: 7,96 € / kg

One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste
Chicken

Sort: Chicken * Place of production: Behamberg, Austria

Production method: Farm * Time of production: All- season

Transporting distance: 183 km * Means of transportation: Truck

Carbon footprint (total) per kg: 3,54 kg * Water requirement (total) per kg: 1551 l

Price: 3,69 € / kg

One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste
Bananas

Sort: Bananas ‚Cavendish’ * Place of production: Mao Valverde, Dominican Republic

Cultivation method: Outdoor plantation * Time of harvest: All- season

Transporting distance: 8500km (linear distance) * Means of Transportation: Ship, Truck

Carbon footprint (total) per kg: 1,61 kg * Water requirement (total) per kg: 643 l

Price: 1,49€ / kg

One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste
Barbecue Sausage

Sort: Barbecue Sausage, rolled * Place of production: Herdecke, Germany

Production method: Factory production * Time of production: All- season

Transporting distance: 944 km * Means of transportation: Truck

Carbon footprint (total) per kg: 5,03 kg * Water requirement (transportation) per kg: 1 l

Price: 9,50 € / kg

One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste
Beetroots

Sort: Beetrots ‘Forono’ * Place of production: Zorawina, Wroclaw, Poland

Cultivation method: Foil green house * Time of harvest: May – September

Transporting distance: 485 km * Means of transportation: Truck

Carbon footprint (total) per kg: 0,24 kg * Water requirement (total) per kg: 386 l

Price: 1,20 € / kg

One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste
Blackberries

Sort: Blackberries * Place of production: Tuxpan, Jalisco, Mexico

Cultivation method: Outdoor plantation * Time of harvest: October – June

Transporting distance: 9.900 km * Means of transportation: Aircraft, truck

Carbon footprint (total) per kg: 11,97 kg * Water requirement (total) per kg: 40 l

Price: 15,92 € / kg

Foto lainnya :

One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste

13.-cauliflower_fin

One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste
One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste
One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste
One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste

25.-eggs_fin

One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste
One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste
One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste
One third  - a project on food waste
One third – a project on food waste

sumber :

foto selengkapnya di : http://kpic.at/images/2569

http://waste360.com/food-waste/photographers-12-unique-views-food-waste#slide-0-field_images-194641